Scams on online dating sites Bulgarian sites for live sex cams

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After discovering that his headshot consistently showed in hoax dating profiles (thanks to a Google alert), Army Master Sgt. “Over the past few years, I’ve seen these scammers use all kinds of photos removed from open Facebook pages, blogs, official military websites, and command pages,” he wrote in a blog post last month.“I’ve also seen my own photos and name used.” (The image of Grisham that was used by scammers is pictured, left) With a few of the largest player like OKCupid, Match, and others, there are precautionary measures in place.Never re-ship anything for strangers, especially to Africa.There is a reason why online merchants usually don't ship there.The lesson here is that online dating startups will need to step up their game to keep consumers safe.“In the war against online dating scams and security threats, we’ve chosen to do whatever is necessary to always be a few steps ahead of scammers, and not the other way around – which is usually too late for our users,” said Cupid.com’s CEO, Bill Dobbie.

Usually they say to keep some money for your trouble.

Recently there are also Nigerian scams originating from Malaysia, China, India, Turkey, Spain, Cyprus, Egypt, as that's where Nigerians are located since they can easily get to these countries without visas or on the student visas.

Men are usually widowed engineers, building contractors, military, vet doctors, surgeons or antique dealers.

Once they’ve made contact, they will typically request to move the conversation to a private instant messaging service.

He or she will begin the courtship process by sending letters and love poems for a period of weeks and finally offer to fly to meet their victim.

The scam typically works like this: A con artist, usually based in an Internet cafe overseas, will lift a photo from Facebook or another social networking site.

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