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My suspicions were aroused by my friend's description of the site: drop-dead gorgeous women everywhere, constantly sending him letters and chat pop-up requests, yet for every letter read after a lady's first, he had to pay ten credits, and ten credits likewise to send a lady a reply letter - instant messaging chats cost one credit per minute after the first three (free) minutes.Credits could be bought at varying rates depending on how many you bought at a time, ranging from per ten credits to per ten credits.It is even strongly suggestive of systemic scamming - that these letters are sent out by the system itself rather than by personal agents.Today (14 July 2014), I came upon the smoking gun that all but proves that this is the case: the second line of a letter from "Shanshan(Joan)" contained a typo which reveals that, apparently, variables such as can be set in these letters, strong evidence that these letters are actually generated by a script which replaces variables with values and then automatically sends the letters out.Many of the letter writers purported to have read "Michael's" profile, in which he solicited messages from scammers only - yet here they were messaging him anyway.This is damning enough as it is, but I've got an even better actual smoking gun to present afterwards, so read on for that.Here is a sample of those quotes from those letters, including any of my comments in grey.

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All of the above points strongly to scamming - that deceptive letters are sent out without regard for any particular qualities of their recipients (other than having money to spend).

So, about 70% of the first 23 letters I opened either by a charitable interpretation blatantly or implicitly lied, and/or, by a more likely interpretation, attempted to scam "Michael" by flattering him and pretending interest only so that he would spend money (between and a pop) to read and reply to future letters.

That's not to say that the remaining 30% were not scammers, and, indeed, the style of their letters was very similar.

Below is a screenshot of the letter in question, in which I have circled the smoking gun in red.

Please take a moment to consider the implications of this. Presumably, your letter is assigned to a paid member of the team, who, with the help of software, with minimal effort crafts a passably "personal" response to your letter, which you pay between and to read, and another between and to respond to.

A sample of some of the first few messages "Michael" received, along with my commentary, if any, in grey, follows.

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