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Within 24 hours, the letters began accumulating in "Michael's" inbox.

Again, most of the women in the photographs looked like professional models.

Many of the letter writers purported to have read "Michael's" profile, in which he solicited messages from scammers only - yet here they were messaging him anyway.

This is damning enough as it is, but I've got an even better actual smoking gun to present afterwards, so read on for that.

I also can't fail to mention that after the first photograph in each letter, it costs ten credits to open each photograph, and that, surprise, surprise, many (around 50%) of the letters "Michael" received contained more than one photograph.

To give you an idea of the frequency of the letters, around 60 letters arrived within the first nine days - about 6.5 letters per day.

I could be pretty certain, then, that anybody messaging him either had not read his profile, or was a scammer, or (most likely) both. Screenshot of Michael Michaelson profile edit | Screenshot of Michael Michaelson profile as seen by ladies Further on, I present a single piece of persuasive evidence from the results of this fake profile that the scamming on is systemic.

If you want to go straight to that evidence, then please click here.

Please take a moment to consider the implications of this. Presumably, your letter is assigned to a paid member of the team, who, with the help of software, with minimal effort crafts a passably "personal" response to your letter, which you pay between and to read, and another between and to respond to.

It is even strongly suggestive of systemic scamming - that these letters are sent out by the system itself rather than by personal agents.

Today (14 July 2014), I came upon the smoking gun that all but proves that this is the case: the second line of a letter from "Shanshan(Joan)" contained a typo which reveals that, apparently, variables such as can be set in these letters, strong evidence that these letters are actually generated by a script which replaces variables with values and then automatically sends the letters out.

Concerned that my friend was being scammed, I did some investigating, and came to the conclusion that yes, he was. Here, then, is my research, to warn those considering using against wasting their time and money.

My investigations took two forms: direct investigation by registering a fake profile, and indirect investigation by scouring the net for positive/negative reviews.

Chat pop-ups for "John" didn't start as immediately as for "Michael", but once they did (after about a day), they were similarly incessant, and equally implausible.

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