Vintage postcard dating dating soldier ptsd

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I used alphabet stamps from Inkadinkadoo (the original was discontinued; find a similar one here) and a bird stamp from Paper Source to add a little something extra! I love how simple and budget-friendly these are while still really setting the tone for your wedding and showing a lot of personality. Don’t forget to check out our DIY project gallery and all of our DIY weddings for more inspiration!

And while you’re at it, follow us on Pinterest for lots more DIY fun.

Dating of the postcards can be done from the style of the address side of the card and from the style of the stamp box. Original RPPC (real photo post card) showing a little girl surrounded by her toys. In the foreground is another soldier with a bayonet and men in formal elaborate military garb who are walking up stairs. There are a few minute insignificant flaws at the left border. Naftzinger Funeral Director and Embalmer Furniture and Rugs Centerport, Pa. There is some wear & rounding at the corners & a little wear along the edges.

has an excellent guide to identifying and dating vintage Real Photo Postcards from the design of the stamp boxes on the card. There are two tiny creases at the bottom left corner tip. Original RPPC (real photo post card) showing a girl with curls in an "American" toy pedal car. The back has an AZO stamp box with the two top triangles pointing up & the two bottom triangles pointing down. There is a minor bend at the top left corner tip that does not break the surface. On the left side is a doll laying on a hammock hanging over a table full of toy china dishes. The card is in fresh excellent/near mint unused condition just like it turned up in a Pennsylvania estate. This is an original real photo postcard of lodge members standing in front of the Easton, Pa. There is a tiny crease 1/8" in from the top left corner. There is a 7/16" tear at the left border & a 1/16" tear at the right border. There are five tiny pinpoint size ink spots on the buildings.

Kristie is from Virginia and I’m from Connecticut, but we met and currently live in Massachusetts, so we tried to find postcards from those three states—and a few that didn’t quite fit that mold, but we chose just because they were so beautiful!

Occasional fakes of highly collectible subjects turn up and can be spotted by a close examination of the address side of the card where dust shadows have been printed rather than acquired from age. This is an original real photo postcard of a family outside. Original RPPC (real photo post card) showing a young kid with a very large tin toy train engine. The card was never addressed & it was never mailed. One hand of the girl is supporting a doll that sits in a wooden homemade tiller type automobile with a bell on the front. This looks like it occurred in the making of the card just before it dried & is probably the fingerprint of the photographer. The card is in fresh near mint unused condition just like it turned up in a Pennsylvania estate. This is an original real photo postcard of the Middletown Fire Apr 9, 1910 which took place in Middletown, Pennsylvania. The back is slightly soiled & has been addressed but not mailed. Original RPPC (real photo post card) showing the J. In the circle there is a minute 1/16" diameter indentation in the paper. This is an original real photo postcard of a parade.

Some of the people in the car look down over the passenger side doors at the little toy car. Some distance back behind the float there is a band of black musicians. Other signs can be seen in the image including one with the word "Creamery" on the building on the right. There is a 1 1/2" long diagonal crease that can be seen in the photo just to the left of center in the upper part of the postcard. The horse on the right wears a patriotic star blanket.

The tin toy car in the image is a German litho tin windup limousine with a chauffeur driver. One of the band members carries a banner that says "Sarabia". The second floors of the buildings also have black spectators (mostly children) leaning on the railings. What can be read of that sign is: "rseheads Creamery Store House." Perhaps the "rse" is part of the name "Horseheads"? A sign over the top of the building on the left reads either "A. There is some light soiling and stains on the address side of the postcard. Early twentieth century real photo postcard showing a man flying a biplane over buildings, churches, and residences. The card was never addressed & it was never mailed. The post card has a divided back & an AZO stamp box with four triangles pointed up at the corners. Five original RPPC (real photo post cards) showing a man with a peg leg with his horse Toddax.

I’m excited to share a DIY from an Oh Lovely Day reader and recent bride, Hannah from the Homesteady.

This is the first of a series of DIY she’s going to share from her own wedding.

Postcards with black and white photographic images were popular beginning in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. (Measurements may vary by 1/16 inch.) The condition of the postcards is shown in the accompanying photographs.

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